Your Weekend Reader for Sept. 9-10

by | Sep 9, 2023 | Weekend Reader | 1 comment

Does it strike anyone else as odd that the big news in the continuing Pac-12 Conference story almost always breaks on a Friday? I’ll need to go back and see what day of the week it was when UCLA and USC first announced they were abandoning the conference for the Big 12.

The latest big news in the story broke — yes — Friday, when Oregon State University and Washington State University went to court in a not completely unexpected step: The lawsuit, which names the Pac-12 Conference and Commissioner George Kliavkoff as defendants, is part of OSU and WSU’s efforts to ensure that those schools get to split the assets of the Pac-12 among them — instead of sharing them with the other conference members, all of which have announced plans to depart the conference for presumably richer waters. If the Beavers and the Cougars have to share with all of the defectors, that could spell doom for the schools’ efforts to rebuild the Pac-12. (Which remains a long shot.)

Specifically, as ace Pac-12 reporter Jon Wilner reports, OSU and WSU are seeking a declaratory judgment on the issue of whether a departing school should remain on the Pac-12’s board of directors, with any say on the issues facing the conference. They also seek a restraining order stopping Kliavkoff from holding a scheduled Sept. 13 meeting with all 12 schools.

The key issue here could be what determines a “notice of withdrawal” from the conference. The lawsuit argues — and this would appear to have some merit — that when you issue news releases and send out social-media notices that say you’re joining another conference, that should constitute a “notice of withdrawal.” And the lawsuit notes that when USC and UCLA said they were leaving the Pac-12, those schools lost their right to participate on the board or vote on conference matters.

A hearing in the lawsuit is scheduled for Monday, which at least will break the string of Pac-12 news developments occurring on Friday.

You can read a copy of the lawsuit filing by clicking here.

And you can read a copy of the motion for a temporary restraining order by clicking here.

Here’s additional reading on this, if you’re interested (both pieces are protected by paywalls):

The Athletic’s Nicole Auerbach and Chris Vannini provide useful background on the events leading up to the lawsuit.

Nick Daschel, who does a terrific job covering OSU sports for The Oregonian/OregonLive, caught up with OSU athletic director Scott Barnes, who said the lawsuit was not meant as an adversarial action and wasn’t meant as a personal attack on Kliavkoff. But, of course, it’s easier to say that when you’re the one doing the suing.

It was just a few weeks ago, wasn’t it, when Your Weekend Reader predicted that the next action on this would be handled by lawyers and accountants? Sounds like the lawyers are hard at work — and I’d guess that the accountants are plenty busy as well.

There is other news this week to send your way, of course:

Lynne Terry of the Oregon Capital Chronicle has a story about an Oregon Health Authority report that tracks spending on health care in the state. In 2021, the report found, Oregonians spent $31 billion on health care — it works to be about $8,000 per person, or about 22% of a household budget. It’s an increase of about 40% since 2013. But between 2020 and 2021, costs rose just 3.5%, close to a legislatively set target of 3.4% annually.

A new study from the Northwestern Medill Local News Initiative found higher-than-expected levels of news engagement among teenagers. Nearly 30% of teenagers said they engage with the news on a daily basis. Now, the bad news: Their three preferred sources of news are TikTok, YouTube and Facebook. And more than half of them said they never get their news from a newspaper. In fact, news satire ranked above actual newspapers as a source of news for teenagers.

Are you ready to bid adieu to summer, and its bouts of strange weather (although the mid-valley seemed to escape much of the weirdness that afflicted much of the rest of the nation)? Well, fall might be right around the corner, but that doesn’t mean we’re about to return to normal weather patterns. Blame climate change — and El Nino, as this excellent piece from Lois Parshley in The Atlantic explains. (Atlantic articles remain behind a pay wall.)

If your church is like mine, it started offering virtual services over the internet during the COVID pandemic — and has continued to do so, even as COVID (sort of) wanes. The Pew Research Center looked into this, and found (as you would expect) that most church members preferred attending services in person. But 10% of Americans said they only watched services on TV or online. (Of course, the majority of Americans don’t attend any sort of religious service, either in person or streamed.)

Do you want to catch a glimpse of that newly discovered comet? If so, better plan on rising before dawn — and you should plan on doing that over the next few days, Marcia Dunn of The Associated Press reports.

Speaking of the cosmos, it’s always good to take the long view. So take the time to read this fascinating feature from Dennis Overbye of The New York Times, about the radio telescope in New Jersey that collected the first concrete evidence, some 50 years ago, that the Big Bang actually occurred, some 13.8 billion years ago. The site should be treated as a national treasure — but the new owner of the property is considering building a senior housing development there.

And speaking of the long run: The Rolling Stones have a new album, “Hackney Diamonds,” due Oct. 20. It’s the band’s first album of new material since 2005’s “A Bigger Bang” and the first since drummer Charlie Watts died in 2021. (Steve Jordan now fills the drum chair for the band.) In case, you’re wondering: Mick Jagger is 80. Ronnie Wood is 76. And Keith Richards somehow has made it to 79, so there’s hope for the rest of us.

Want your art event listed?

Read more published work

Subscribe to Blog via Email

Recent Blog Posts

Your Weekend Reader for June 15-16

Your Weekend Reader for June 15-16

Suicide in the West. Kristof’s harsh words for liberals. Wildfire smoke. OSU’s athletics budget. Minutes from the county commission. Transcriptions from your iPhone. Weird scenes at the amusement park. Funny highway signs. And Biden bingo. It’s a good edition of Your Weekend Reader.

read more
Your Weekend Reader for June 8-9

Your Weekend Reader for June 8-9

New angles on the rural-urban divide. Rising seas. OHSU layoffs. The British (journalists) are coming. A federal Project Turnkey? A swiped statue. An old scam, with an FBI twist. And look on the bright side of life. It’s all in the new edition of Your Weekend Reader.

read more
Your Weekend Reader for June 1-2

Your Weekend Reader for June 1-2

Unexpected ramifications from the Trump verdicts. Life at a newspaper’s democracy desk. Fact-based journalism. Oregon politics. California ponders psychedelics. What’s wrong at the box office? All of this, and more, is in the next edition of Your Weekend Reader.

read more

Disclaimer

The views and opinions expressed in this blog are those of the author and do not reflect the official policy or position of any other agency, organization, employer, or company.

Comments on this website are the sole responsiblity of their writers and the writers will take full responsiblity, liability and blame for any libel or litigation that results from something written in or as a direct result of something written in a comment.

We reserve the right to delete any comment for any reason whatsoever.

More Blog Posts

Your Weekend Reader for June 15-16

Suicide in the West. Kristof’s harsh words for liberals. Wildfire smoke. OSU’s athletics budget. Minutes from the county commission. Transcriptions from your iPhone. Weird scenes at the amusement park. Funny highway signs. And Biden bingo. It’s a good edition of Your Weekend Reader.

read more

Your Weekend Reader for June 8-9

New angles on the rural-urban divide. Rising seas. OHSU layoffs. The British (journalists) are coming. A federal Project Turnkey? A swiped statue. An old scam, with an FBI twist. And look on the bright side of life. It’s all in the new edition of Your Weekend Reader.

read more